ON THIS DAY IN MUSIC HISTORY: 11.24.20


1972 - Produced by Don Kirshner, the TV series In Concert debuts on ABC as a competitor to NBC's Midnight Special. Guests on the first two episodes include Chuck Berry, Alice Cooper, Blood, Sweat & Tears, The Allman Brothers Band, and Poco.

1973 - Ringo Starr went to No. 1 on the U.S. singles chart with "Photograph." His first of two U.S. chart toppers as a solo artist. Co-written with George Harrison, work on the song began on a luxury yacht Ringo had rented while attending Mick Jagger's wedding and the Cannes Film Festival.

1993 - Blues guitarist and singer Albert Collins -- known as "The Master of the Telecaster" -- died of lung cancer at age 61.

1991- Queen's Freddie Mercury died of complications from AIDS at his home in London's Holland park at age 45, just one day after he publicly announced he was HIV positive. Mercury was known for his powerful vocal range and live performances, but also as the composer of many of Queen's biggest hits such as "Bohemian Rhapsody," "Killer Queen," "Somebody to Love," "Crazy Little Thing Called Love," and "We Are the Champions." Regarded as one of the greatest singers in the history of rock music, he is especially known for his amazing stage presence and his four-octave vocal range. (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

Birthdays:

Donald "Duck" Dunn, bassist for Booker T and the MG's and the Blues Brothers, was born today in 1941.

Pete Best, the original drummer for The Beatles, is 79.

ELO drummer Bev Bevan is 76.

Blondie drummer Clem Burke is 66.

On This Day In Music History is sourced from This Day in Music, Paul Shaffer's Day in Rock, Song Facts and Wikipedia.